News

Scientists drilling first deep ice core at the South Pole
University of Washington, Hannah Hickey

This winter, when many people's imaginations were fixed on the North Pole, a small group of scientists has been working on the other side of the planet. In round-the-clock daylight and frigid temperatures, glaciologists have been drilling an ice core at the South Pole.

Drilling continues through the end of January for the first of two years of a joint project by the University of Washington and the University of California, Irvine. The National Science Foundation is funding the South Pole Ice Core Project to dig into climate history at the planet's southernmost tip.

Fall 2014 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2014 In-Depth Newsletter is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Fall 2014 issue:

NICL Long Range Sustainability Plan

Development of Intermediate Drill set to produce Antarctic ice cores from 1,500 meters
:: by Rachel Walker

NICL Experience Inspires Path Forward
:: by Jen Lennon

IPICS 2nd Open Science Conference

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.

Spring 2014 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Spring 2014 In-Depth Newsletter is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Spring 2014 issue:

An Update on International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences
:: by Ed Brook, Oregon State University, IPICS co-Chair

Getty Dusty in the Name of Science
:: by Bess Koffman, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Frozen in time: Three-million-year-old landscape still exists beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet
:: NSF Press Release 14-057

Blown Past: Dust found in Antarctic ice cores offers clues to ancient climate
:: by Peter Rejcek, The Antarctic Sun

Young Ice Core Scientists' Network

Brian Bencivengo: Farewell & Thanks!
:: By Richard Nunn, National Ice Core Laboratory

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.

Fall 2013 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2013 In-Depth Newsletter is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Fall 2013 issue:

The National Ice Core Lab – 2013 and Beyond!
:: by Betty Adrian, Technical Director, NICL

Reconstructing Central Alaskan Precipitation Variability and Atmospheric Circulation over the Past Millennium
:: by Dominic Winski, Dartmouth College

A 2000 Year Record of Atmospheric Aerosols and Gases Collected from the High Arctic
:: by Olivia Maselli, Desert Research Institute

South Pole 1500-meter Ice Core Project
:: by South Pole Ice Core Project Team

NSF, U.S. Antarctic Program partners, working to restore Antarctic research season to the maximum extent possible

:: NSF Press Release 13-182

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Faithful reproduction – Team at NICL processes replicate ice cores from WAIS Divide
The Antarctic Sun, Peter Rejcek

It's a scene that's been repeated for the last several summers in the Denver metro area: People bundled in thick coats, wool hats and heavy boots – as if ready for an arctic adventure – step into what appears to be a white-walled workshop. There are table saws and planers and less familiar instruments, including a device that sports electrodes.

This is the ice core processing room for the National Ice Core Laboratory at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., with an ambient temperature of minus 24 degrees Celsius.

National Ice Core Lab Stores Valuable Ancient Ice – Lab supplies Arctic, Antarctic ice cores critical to climate research
Science Nation, National Science Foundation

It's a freezing cold day inside the National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) in Denver, Colo., as it is every day of the year. That's because the NICL is a facility for storing and studying ice cores recovered from the polar regions of the world. It's minus 23.3 degrees Celsius (minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit) inside, so everyone is bundled up in ski parkas, insulated gloves and boots. And, saws are buzzing, as scientists from all over the U.S. are measuring and cutting pieces of precious Antarctic glacier ice to take back to their labs for research.

Processed and packaged – Last cores from WAIS Divide borehole go through NICL
The Antarctic Sun, Peter Rejcek

It took a month to prepare for a week's worth of work at the National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) in Lakewood, Colo. It was a long time in coming.

But the final sections of ice core from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide were sliced and diced in mid-June, with samples of ancient ice destined for labs across the country to analyze the paleoclimate record. About 75 meters of ice were processed through NICL after the hole was deepened this past field season.

Fall 2011 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2011 In-Depth Newsletter is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Fall 2011 issue:

  • Getting to the Bottom: NICL Team Processes Deepest Ice from WAIS Divide Project
    • Peter Rejcek (The Antarctic Sun)
  • NICL Update - Evaporative Condenser Unit
    • Betty Adrian (NICL)
  • CH2M HILL Polar Services Wins Arctic Contract
  • Replicate Ice Coring System
    • Joe Souney (Ice Drilling Program Office)
  • NICL Use and Ice Core Access

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.

Getting to the Bottom – NICL team processes deepest ice from WAIS Divide project
The Antarctic Sun, Peter Rejcek

Mick Sternberg had literally made the same measurement a thousand times before. But this meter-long ice core was perhaps just a little more special. He double-checked his numbers on the final length, stood back, and rechecked again.

"No reason to rush through this," he said under his breath, which steamed out in the freezing temperatures of the National Ice Core Laboratory's processing room.

After all, this last section of ice, drilled from near the bottom of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) at a depth of about 3,331 meters, had been waiting around for a while. Probably somewhere in the neighborhood of 55,000 to 60,000 years

Spring 2011 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Spring 2011 In-Depth Newsletter is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Spring 2011 issue:

  • Searching for Ancient Air on the Taylor Glacier
    • Thomas Bauska (Oregon State University)
  • The Ultimate Classroom: Fieldwork at Allan Hills, Antarctica Provides Lifetime of Learning
    • Nicole Spaulding (University of Maine)
  • NICL Update
    • Betty Adrian (NICL)
  • A Story Captured in Ice
    • Daniel J. Vaccaro (Regis University)
  • WAIS Divide Ice Core Update
  • Upcoming Meetings, Ice Core Working Group Members, Recently Funded Projects

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.