News

Arks of the Apocalypse
The New York Times Magazine, photographs by Spencer Lowell and text by Malia Wollan

All around the world, scientists are building repositories of everything from seeds to ice to mammal milk — racing to preserve a natural order that is fast disappearing.

A Frigid Colorado Archive On Climate Change Faces An Uncertain Future
Colorado Public Radio, Sam Brasch

You may have never heard of it, but one of the world's most important archives on climate change is right here in Colorado. The National Ice Core Laboratory in West Denver holds records on the atmosphere going back hundreds of thousands of years. The data at NICL isn't stored on disks or in books. Inside the freezer, aisles are stacked floor-to-ceiling with silver cylinders about the length of your arm. Each tube holds ice cores recovered from polar regions of the planet.

Fall 2016 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2016 In-Depth newsletter from the National Ice Core Laboratory-Science Management Office (NICL-SMO) is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Fall 2016 issue:

Dr. Lindsay Powers hired as NICL's Technical Director
:: NICL

Ice flow and ice cores in the St. Elias Mountains
:: Karl Kreutz and Seth Campbell, University of Maine

Ancient ice reveals vital clues about Earth's past climate
:: Dan Elliot, Associated Press

Leading UMaine researcher perishes in accident in Antarctica
:: UMaine News, University of Maine

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us ( nicl.smo@unh.edu ) if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.

From the South Pole to the science section: How ice becomes knowledge
Ars Technica, Scott K. Johnson

It's -30 degrees Celsius, even though the Sun hangs ceaselessly in the sky. Dressed in puffy, insulated suits and gloves thick enough to both hinder dexterity and preserve fingers, a team gamely tilts a drill barrel back to horizontal. With one smooth, firm motion, a two-meter-long cylinder of ice, bursting with history, is pushed free and slides down a temporary work bench.

Ancient ice reveals vital clues about Earth's past climate
Associated Press, Dan Elliott

Inside a huge walk-in freezer in suburban Denver, a college student in a thick parka shoots a jolt of electricity through a yard-long column of ice extracted from Antarctica. Just outside the freezer, in a much warmer room, a computer wired to the ice registers a sudden spike in a jagged red line crawling across the screen.

Spring 2016 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Spring 2016 In-Depth newsletter from the National Ice Core Laboratory-Science Management Office (NICL-SMO) is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Spring 2016 issue:

Betty Adrian, NICL Technical Director, retires
:: by By Betty Adrian, Technical Director, NICL (retired)

Princeton researchers go to the end of the Earth for the world's oldest ice
:: by Morgan Kelly, courtesy of Princeton University Office of Communications

Getting to the Bottom of SPICECORE: Researchers drill deep into the ice beneath the South Pole to sample Earth's ancient atmosphere
:: by Michael Lucibella, Antarctic Sun Editor

$2.3M grant moves ice cores a step closer to UAlberta
:: by Jennifer Pascoe, courtesy of the University of Alberta

Report from the 2nd International Partnerships in Ice Core Sciences open science conference
:: by Eric Wolff, IPICS co-chair and co-chair of SCAR's IPICS Expert Group

Ice Core Young Scientists (ICYS) workshop report
:: by ICYS Executive Committee

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.

Getting to the Bottom of SPICECORE – Researchers drill deep into the ice beneath the South Pole to sample Earth's ancient atmosphere
The Antarctic Sun, Mike Lucibella

As the winch extracted a two-meter-long cylinder of ancient ice in late December, Murat Aydin looked on. "If we can keep this pace up we should be able to hit 1,600 meters," he said. "This is going to be the deepest ice core drilled at the South Pole by quite a margin." By the end of the project a month later, researchers with the South Pole Ice Core project, known more succinctly as SPICECORE, had exceeded even their most ambitious goals.

Fall 2015 In-Depth Newsletter Now Available

The Fall 2015 In-Depth newsletter from the National Ice Core Laboratory-Science Management Office (NICL-SMO) is now available online at https://icecores.org/indepth/

In the Fall 2015 issue:

Immerse yourself in ice: The U.S. Ice Drilling Program's "School of Ice"
:: by Linda Morris, Dartmouth College/U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office

International research team drills new Greenland ice core through the Renland ice cap
:: by NICL-SMO

Volcanic eruptions that changed human history
:: Desert Research Institute Press Release

New program directors within Division of Polar Programs
:: by NICL-SMO

Empowering educators at the School of Ice: U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office Offers Educators a Close-Up Look at Ice Core Science
:: by Mike Lucibella, Antarctic Sun editor

We are interested in project stories and news from the ice coring community. Please contact us if you are interested in submitting a story or news item to In-Depth.

Empowering Educators at the School of Ice – U.S. Ice Drilling Program Office Offers Educators a Close-Up Look at Ice Core Science
The Antarctic Sun, Mike Lucibella

To the casual observer, mid-June may not seem like the ideal time to explore the science of ancient ice. However, last month, as the hot sun beat down outside, a dozen geoscience professors donned boots and thick red parkas to brave sub-zero freezers and learn the secrets embedded in ice many thousands of years old, from the coldest places on Earth.

How Scientists Use Ice Cores To See Nearly 1 Million Years Of Past Climate
CBS Denver, Chris Spears

It might be easy to agree that global climates are changing, but what's driving the change is a much more controversial topic of conversation. Climate scientists are confident that human activity is a main driver, but how did they come to that conclusion? Research at places like the National Ice Core Lab in Lakewood, Colorado, help provide answers.